History Of Silver Tea Caddies

Tea was extremely expensive in the 18th century, and it was therefore natural that the containers to hold it should be made in silver. Early caddies are octagonal and have a detachable cap which doubles as a measure. The early ones in particular are sometimes lead-lined with sliding bases or covers for ease of filling.

At first caddies came singly, but in the 1720s pairs became common, one for green and one for black tea. At this date they can be found in a lockable case. In the smartest sets there is sometimes a set of teaspoons, sugar nips and a mote spoon, but not a caddy spoon as these do not appear until the 1780s. How people measured the tea between the demise of the detachable cap and the introduction of the caddy spoon is not known. Hinged lids on caddies are preferred to lids that lift off. The increasing availability of and fondness for sugar led to caddies being produced in sets of three; initially the sugar container looked like another caddy but soon evolved into a slightly different shape.

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History Of Silver Baskets

History Of Silver BasketsBaskets described in old invoices as being for bread or cake have for a long time been more often used for fruit.

Although baskets existed in England in the 17th century, examples earlier than 1740 are rare. After this date, they survive in very large numbers. American baskets are very rare. As most baskets have pierced decoration and were in daily use for a long time it is important to check them carefully for damage, especially those with pierced decoration

As with many different types of silver, baskets were made more lightly as the years passed, due probably to increasing demand from the less wealthy section of the population, and to the introduction of the rolling mill, which led to large-scale production. However, the Regency period produced some notably heavy examples. Weight at this time was considered synonymous with quality.

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Tips For Buying Fine Art

Art, like music, is a universal language. It beautifies our homes, expresses our tastes and enriches our lives. Collecting art is open to everyone. But how does one start?

To help you become more knowledgeable and confident in acquiring art, and to ensure that your collection lives up to your expectations, WorthWhat answers these commonly asked questions about the fine art of collecting.

How do I start?

The first step is to develop an appreciation of what good art is and to learn about the many kinds of art available. To start, visit galleries and museums. Such visits will give you the opportunity to see what types of art most appeal to you and equally important, what doesn’t. Most museums have lectures and audio-visual tours that will enhance your appreciation of art. Visits to auction houses will then enable you to more closely inspect the kinds of art in which you are interested, furthering the development of your taste. After awhile you will be in a firmer position to decide what you want to own. Art sections of newspapers and art magazines such as Art News and Art & Antiques are excellent sources of information on current trends in art and art collecting. Read these not to find out what you “should” be collecting, but to broaden your knowledge. Books by art collectors will give you insights into the process and strategy involved in collecting.

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How To Preserve And Store Antique Quilts

Question

I am almost 60 years old. I have a quilt that was made by my paternal grandmother and her mother sometime in the years before I was born (1953). I don’t know how many years – it could have been they did this in the 1930’s or as late as the 1940’s. Would this quilt be considered old?

I keep it in a trunk that I have. Is there something special I should do to preserve it? It looks like new still as it’s not been used at all. I have a lot of other quilts, too, that were done by my mother-in-law but they were done in recent decades. There *is* one that is older that she inherited and didn’t make herself. I don’t use these quilts.

They are folded and inside individual pillow cases and stacked on each other on top of an antique wash stand of some sort that she had. My house is small with just our one bedroom and bed and the grandkids are on/in that bed sometimes so I just keep old stuff on there that I don’t care about. Some day these quilts will belong to those kids. 🙂 Anita.

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History Of Old Postcards

History Of Old Postcards
History Of Old Postcards

Two Philadelphians, J. P. Charlton and H. L. Limpan, came up with a simple but great idea in 1861. Their “Lipman’s Postal Card” had a blank front for writing messages. The back was inscribed with three lines-one with their patent mark, the other two for addressing and stamping. They advertised their product was great for sending rapid correspondence at half the price of paper and envelopes. They claimed their invention would be valuable for travelers, and boasted merchants could use their stiff cards to send notices and circulars. The Post Card, they deduced, would lighten mail, cheapen postage, and surely make them rich. It did not. Good ideas alone do not make one wealthy. It is reasonable to assume that the Lipman Postal Card was a flop, for only a few have been found, and its inventors are all but forgotten.

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A History Of Antique Chinese Ivory

The use of elephant ivory can be traced back many centuries. It is a sought after material on par with gold and jade in China and used for decorative as well as religious objects. Ivory carving is one of China’s oldest art forms, examples have been found in Shang dynasty tombs. In ancient times elephants roamed the forests of the yellow river region (Huang He)

In the Zhou dynasty (1046 – 256 BC) it was fashionable for high officials to wear narrow memorandum tablets made of ivory, these were called hu and were worn as girdle pendants. By the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) these tablets had come to be a mark of rank and were required as part of formal dress. Then in the Tang dynasty (618 – 907) and the Song dynasty (960 -1279) the ivory tablets were larger and were carried by court officials as scepters.

The tablets continued to be used as a mark of high rank up until the end of the Ming dynasty in the 17th century. Then in the Qing dynasty (1644 – 1911) China’s traditional ivory carving peaked.

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